Joe and Doug from Chromatrope had the opportunity to overload their brains and recharge their creativity recently during the Maker Faire in New York City.

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The show was a cross-pollination of tech and craft with everything including 3d printed food (chocolate), a full size 3d printed car, a demonstration by one of the originators of the Moog, dozens of robots, and thousands of enthusiasts.

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Maker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth—a family-friendly festival of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker movement.

Part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new, Maker Faire is an all-ages gathering of tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, science clubs, authors, artists, students, and commercial exhibitors.

All of these “makers” come to Maker Faire to show what they have made and to share what they have learned.


The launch of Maker Faire in the Bay Area in 2006 demonstrated the popularity of making and interest among legions of aspiring makers to participate in hands-on activities and learn new skills at the event. A record 195,000 people attended the two flagship Maker Faires in the Bay Area and New York in 2013, with 44% of attendees first timers at the Bay Area event, and 61% in New York. A family event, 50% attend the event with children. Also in 2013, 98 independently-produced Mini and Featured Maker Faires occurred around the world, including Tokyo, Rome, Santiago, and Oslo.

Maker Faire is primarily designed to be forward-looking, showcasing makers who are exploring new forms and new technologies. But it’s not just for the novel in technical fields; Maker Faire features innovation and experimentation across the spectrum of science, engineering, art, performance and craft.

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